Available courses

URP 283: Statistics for Planners- II

Number of Credit: 3.0; Contact Hour: 03 hours/week

 Decision Making: Statistical inference: hypothesis testing, inference about means, standard   deviations and proportions; analysis of variance; Chi-square test. Measurement scales. Nonparametric tests. Simple correlation and linear regression: Least-squares equation, goodness-of-fit criteria, standard errors, significance tests for coefficients. Simple curvilinear regression by variable transformation. Forecasting methods - Time series analysis, causal and probabilistic methods. Population forecasting methods: Arithmetic, geometric, decreasing rate of increase, logistic, ratio and correlation, trend projection and cohort survival.

Recommended References

  • Mian, Md. and Miyan, M. Alimullah,(1984):An Introduction to Statistic: Ideal Library.
  • Gupta, M. K. and Das gupta, Fundamentals of statistics.
  • Statistical Techniques “Business of Economics” Douglas A. Lind, William G. Marchal, Samuel A. Wathen
  • Forecasting Techniques for Urban and Regional Planning, Brian G. Field, Bryan D. MacGregor Hutchinson, London, 1987.
  • Introduction to Econometrics (Third Edition) G.S. Maddala John Wiley & Sons, Ltd New York, 2005.
  • An Introduction to Statistical Problem Solving in Geography J. Chapman McGrew, Jr. Charles B. Monroe Wm. C. Brown Publishers, USA, 1993.
  • Statistics for Management (Seventh Edition) Richard I. Levin, David S. Rubin Prentice Hall of India, New Delhi, 1998.


URP 325: Regional Planning

3.0 credits; 3 hours/week

Definition and types of regions. Regionalization and the delineation of planning regions. Levels of planning - national, regional, sub-regional and local. Need and scope of regional planning. Regional analysis: regional data base; income measures and regional social accounting; input-output analysis; industrial structure analysis; interregional trade multiplier analysis. Theories and models of regional growth: Aggregate growth models; industrial location theory; central place theory; growth pole theory; agropolitan growth. Regional growth - convergence or divergence. Regional development policies at home and abroad. 

Policy issues: Place prosperity vs. people prosperity; economic development vs. regional growth. Regional distribution of public investment - dispersal vs. concentration; balance vs. imbalance; growth vs. welfare; efficiency vs. equity. Policy instruments.

Recommended References

  • Glasson, John, An Introduction to Regional Planning.
  • United Nations, Guidelines for Rural center Planning.
  • Misra, R.P., Regional Planning and Development.
  • Todaro, Michael P., Economic Development in the Third World.
  • Institute of Town Planners, India. Regional Planning and Development.
  • Peter Hall: Theory and practice of Regional Planning

URP 183: Statistics for Planners- II

Number of Credit: 3.0; Contact Hour: 03 hours/week

 Decision Making: Statistical inference: hypothesis testing, inference about means, standard   deviations and proportions; analysis of variance; Chi-square test. Measurement scales. Nonparametric tests (Sign test, Wilcoxon signed ranked test, Wilcoxon rank sum test, Kruskal Wallis test, Rank order correlation). Simple correlation and linear regression: Least-squares equation, goodness-of-fit criteria, standard errors, significance tests for coefficients. Simple curvilinear regression by variable transformation. Multiple regression, Forecasting methods - Time series analysis, causal and probabilistic methods. Population forecasting methods: Arithmetic, geometric, decreasing rate of increase, logistic, ratio and correlation, trend projection and cohort survival.


URP 281: Statistics for Planners I

3.0 credits; 3 hours/week

 Summarizing data: Frequency distribution and graphical presentations, statistical descriptions-samples and populations. Measures of central tendency- mean, median, mode. Measures of dispersion - range, mean deviation, variance and standard deviation, moments, skewness and kurtosis. Basic probability distributions: discrete and continuous probability distributions- Binomial, Poisson and Normal distributions. Sampling and sampling distributions.  Decision analysis: statistical inference – estimation, point and interval estimation. Aggregation and index numbers.

Recommended References

  • Mian, Md. and Miyan, M. Alimullah,(1984):An Introduction to Statistic: Ideal Library.
  • Gupta, M. K. and Das gupta, Fundamentals of statistics.

Legal aspects of planning and its importance. Enabling legislation process. Planning laws in different countries. The Development Plan (structure and local) process and need for legislation. Development control-planning permission, development orders, special forms of control. New town development laws. Compensation and betterment problems. Urban renewal practice. Planning laws in Bangladesh. Pourashava Ordinance, Town Improvement Act, East Bengal Building Construction Act, Building Regulations of RAJUK. Land acquisition and compensation rules and regulations. The meaning of development-the control of development including planning permission, development orders, purchase notice, special forms of control, the enforcement of planning controls, compensation and betterment problems with reference to Bangladesh.

Recommended References

 William F. B. (1969), The Law of City Planning and Zoning, New York, U.S.A, Mc. Graw Publishing Company.

Little A. J, (1977), The Enforcement of Planning Control, London, Shaw and Sons Ltd.

Farooque M. and Rezwana Hasan S. (1996), Laws regulating environment in Bangladesh, Bangladesh Environmental Lawyers Association (BELA), Dhaka.

Rahman, Syed Lutfor, (1991), edited by, Acquisition and Requisition of Property Manual, Dhaka: Soilur Prakashani.


  • Roles and responsibilities of drilling engineer; Well planning, managing & design for safety; Well-control concept and techniques (Driller's and Engineer's method). 
  • Formation Pore Pressure and Fracture Resistance: Pressure in sedimentary formations; Methods of estimating pore pressure and fracture resistance
  • Casing Design: Standardization; API performance properties; Design criterion and consideration
  • Directional Drilling: History and background; Reasons for directional drilling; Drilling methodology; Principles of the BHA; Directional drilling measurements; Horizontal, vertical, and complex directional wells and sidetracks.
  • Special Topics: Offshore drilling operations; MWD and LWD; MPD and UBD; Fishing and Sidetracking; Solids Control and Waste management; Drilling in technically challenging environments. Deepwater drilling, directional casing while drilling, extended-reach drilling, high-pressure drilling, high-temperature drilling, multilateral systems, unconventional resources.

This course introduces the students to key mine planning concepts. It provides basic principles and practical methodologies of strategic and conceptual mine planning. It deals with the theoretical principles and practical methodologies associated with mine planning.

URP 181: Statistics for Planners - I
Number of Credit: 3.0; Contact Hour: 03 hours/week
Summarizing data: Frequency distribution and graphical presentations, statistical descriptions - samples and populations. Measures of central tendency- mean, median, mode. Measures of dispersion - range, mean deviation, variance and standard deviation, moments, skewness and kurtosis. Basic probability distributions: discrete and continuous probability distributions- Binomial, Poisson and Normal distributions. Sampling and sampling distributions.  Decision analysis: statistical inference – estimation, point and interval estimation. Aggregation and index numbers: construction of scale, index of prioritization, index of satisfaction or dissatisfaction, index of agreement or disagreement, index of performance etc.


1. Title: Mine Ventilation and Environmental Engineering

2. Credits: 3 (3 lectures of 50 minutes per week)

3. Course Teacher: Mohammed Adnan Noor Abir, Lecturer, Department of PME, CUET

4. Learning Resources:

Textbooks:

  1. Howard L. Hartman; "Mine ventilation and air conditioning, 3rd Edition"; John Wiley and Sons, Inc., 1997; Malcolm J. McPherson.

  2. Vutukuri & Lama; "Environmental Engineering in Mines"; Cambridge University Press,; Cambridge.

  3. S. Ghatak; "Mine Ventilation, Vol. II"; Coalfield Publishers, 1993.

  4. Peter Darling; "SME Mining Engineering Handbook, Third Edition"; Society for Mining, Metallurgy, and Exploration (U.S.), 2011.

5. Prerequisite(s): None

6. Course Designation as Elective or Required: Required

7. Student Learning Outcomes: After successfully completing the course with a grade of D (2.0/4.0) or better, the student should be able to do


CO1

Identify the basic concepts of air quality, mine ventilation system and mine safety.

CO2

Employ the threshold limits of the oxygen, mine gases, mine dust, temperature and humidity in underground mine.

CO3

Identify the natural ventilation and its rules and conditions.

CO4

Analyze underground control, the movement, quality, quantity, temperature and humidity of the air

CO5

Utilize a computing program to design underground ventilation network.

1. Title: PME 411 Well Test Analysis

2. Credits: Three (3 lectures of 50 minutes per week)

3. Course Teacher: Dr. Mohammad Islam Miah, Assistant Professor, Department of PME, CUET

4. Course Materials-Textbooks:

  1.  Lee, J. (1982). Well testing. SPE textbook series. Society of Petroleum Engineers (SPE), Richardson, TX.
  2. Ahmed, T., & McKinney, P. (2011). Advanced reservoir engineering-Chapter 1. Elsevier.
  3. Earlougher, R. C. (1977). Advances in well test analysis (Vol. 5). New York: Henry L. Doherty Memorial Fund of AIME.
  4. Horne, R. N. (1995). Modern Well Test Analysis: A Computer-Aided Approach, Palo Alto, California: Petroway.
  5. Lee, W. J., & Wattenbarger, R. A. (1996). Gas reservoir engineering.
  6. L.P.Dake (1998). Fundamentals of Reservoir Engineering, Chapters 5-8.

References:

5. Prerequisite(s): (Rock & Fluid Properties, Reservoir Engineering)

6. Course Designation as Elective or Required: Required

7. Student Learning Outcomes: ......

1. Title: Fundamental of English and communication skills 

2. Credits: 3 (3 lectures of 50 minutes per week)

3. Course Teacher: Nahida Sultana (assistant professor), Forhad Jamila (assistant professor),  Department of Humanities, CUET

4. Learning Resources:

Textbooks:

1. Communicative skills for engineers by Mishra and Muralikrishna

2. Cambridge English grammar by Raymund Murphy 

3. Oxford practical English usage by Swan

4. Oxford guide to effective writing and speaking by John Seely

6. Academic writing for graduate students by John M. Swales and Christib B. Feak

7. The research students Guide to success by Pat Cryer

8. Common mistakes in English ( T.J. Fitikides)


5. Prerequisites: enrollment in this course 

6. Course Designation as Elective or Required: Required

7. Student Learning Outcomes: After successfully completing the course, the student should be able to do the following : 

CO 1: Recognize importance of English in Engineering field.

CO 2:  Attain competence in the four modes of literacy: reading, writing, speaking, and listening.

CO 3: Develop skills that enable to communicate effectively in personal, social and professional contexts. 

CO 4: Heighten awareness of correct usage of English grammar in writing and speaking 

CO 5: Improve accuracy and fluency in understanding and producing spoken and written English.  

CO 6: Strengthen ability to write academic papers, essays, articles and summaries using the proper approach.
 CO 7: Learn different types, styles and manners of oral communication and give oral presentation. 

https://harvard.service-now.com/ithelp?id=kb_article&sys_id=4c3290f6db5b845430ed1dca4896197f

1. Title: Rock Mechanics

2. Credits: 3 (3 lectures of 50 minutes per week)

3. Course Teacher: Mohammed Adnan Noor Abir, Lecturer, Department of PME, CUET

4. Learning Resources:

Textbooks:

  1.  J. C. Jaeger, N. G. W. Cook, and R. W. Zimmerman; Fundamentals of Rock Mechanics (4th Edition); Blackwell Publishing.
  2. Richard E. Goodman; Introduction to Rock Mechanics (2nd Edition); University of California at Berkeley.
  3. Evert Hoek; Practical Rock Engineering.
  4. B. H. G. Brady, E. T. Brown; Rock Mechanics for Underground Mining(3rd edition).
  5. Erling Fjær, Rune M. Holt, Per Horsrud, Arne M. Raaen, Rasmus Risn; Petroleum Related Rock Mechanics (2nd Edition).

Reference:

  1. Zong-Xian Zhang; Rock Mechanics Related To Mining Engineering; Oulu Mining School, University of Oulu; Finland.

5. Prerequisite(s): None

6. Course Designation as Elective or Required: Required

7. Student Learning Outcomes: After successfully completing the course with a grade of D (2.0/4.0) or better, the student should be able to do the following

CO1

Recognize importance of rock mechanics in petroleum and mining field

CO2

Measure engineering properties and behavior of rock from laboratory testing

CO3

Analyze sustainability of any ground activities (e.g. mine opening, excavation)

CO4

Develop optimal strategic plans for any ground activities

Number systems & codes, Digital logic: Boolean algebra, De Morgan’s Theorems, logic gates and their truth tables, canonical forms, combinational logic circuits, minimization techniques; Arithmetic and data handling logic circuits, decoders and encoders, multiplexers and demultiplexers; Combinational circuit design; Flip-flops; race around problems; Counters: asynchronous and synchronous counters and their applications; Asynchronous and synchronous logic design: State diagram, Mealy and Moore machines; State minimizations and assignments; Pulse mode logic; Fundamental mode design; PLA design; Design using MSI and LSI components.


1. Title: Digital System Design

2. Credits: 3 (3 lectures of 50 minutes per week)

3. Course Teacher: Dr. Asaduzzaman, Professor, Dept. of CSE, CUET

4. Learning Resources:

Textbooks:

1.     Morris M. Mano, Charles R. Kime, Madison; Tom Martin, -- Logic and computer design fundamentals, FIFTH EDITION (2015) Pearson

2.     Morris M. Mano – Digital Logic and Computer Design, FOURTH EDITION

Reference:

1. Alan B. Marcovitz,-- Introduction to Logic Design, Third Edition, McGraw-Hill

2. M. Morris Mano and Michael D. Ciletti, -- Digital Design with an Introduction to the Verilog HDL (FIFTH EDITION, 2015), Pearson

5. Catalog Description: Design using MSI and LSI components; Design of memory subsystem using SRAM and DRAM; Design of various components of a computer: ALU, memory and control unit-hardwired and microprogrammed Microprocessor based designs. Computer bus stander is design using special purpose controllers.

6. Prerequisite(s): CSE 221 (Digital Logic Design), CSE 321 (Computer Architecture)

7. Course Designation as Elective or Required: Required

8. Course Objectives:

(a) Introduce the concept of Modular approach of Digital System Design

(b) Provide a theoretical background in register transfer logic, and use them to model various digital systems

(c) Learn the techniques to design various components of a computer: ALU, memory and control unit-hardwired.

(d) Design and analyze a simple computer and microprogrammed Microprocessor based System.

9. Student Learning Outcomes: After successfully completing the course with a grade of D (2.0/4.0) or better, the student should be able to do the following

No.

Course Learning Outcomes (CLOs)

POs#

1

Use modular approach to decompose a digital system such as a computer in different modules

2

2

Design and analysis various Modules such as ALU, memory, bus and control unit-hardwired, etc

3

3

Design and analyze a simple computer and microprogrammed Microprocessor based System.

3